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Electroyphysiology


Medical Staff


 

Karl Crossen, M.D.: Received a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Alabama in Huntsville. He completed his medical studies at the University of South Alabama College of Medicine, and his internal medicine internship and residency at Washington University School of Medicine, where he also served as chief medical resident and completed cardiology and electrophysiology fellowships. Dr. Crossen is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease and clinical cardiac electrophysiology. He is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and joined the North Mississippi Medical Center staff in 1998.



James E. "Jim" Stone Jr., M.D.: Received a bachelor's degree in physics from Mississippi State University. He completed his medical studies at the University of Alabama School of Medicine, and his internal medicine internship and residency at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He also completed cardiology and electrophysiology fellowships at Wake Forest University Medical Center/North Carolina Baptist Hospital. Dr. Stone is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease and clinical cardiac electrophysiology. He is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology and joined the NMMC medical staff in 1999.

 



Mary Yates, FNP-C: Received her associate's degree from Northeast Mississippi Community College. She completed her bachelor's and master's degrees in nursing at Mississippi University for Women. She is certified by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners in family practice. She did her fellowship in acute care training with the Advanced Practice Clinician Fellowship at NMMC.

 

Electrophysiology Services

 

A pacemaker system is a two-part electrical system that includes a pulse generator (pacemaker) and one or two leads, or wires, which deliver impulses to the heart. The leads also carry signals back from the heart. By “reading” these signals, the pulse generator is able to monitor the heart’s activity and respond appropriately. A pacemaker helps to pace the heart when the natural rate is too slow to pump enough blood to the body.


An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a device designed to administer an electric shock to control cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat) and to restore a normal heart beat. Leads (wires) are advanced into the heart and placed in the appropriate site in the right ventricle (single chamber system) or in the right ventricle and atrium (dual chamber system). Multiple leads may be required for both single and dual chamber systems.


A biventricular device (pacemaker or ICD) is for treatment of moderate to severe heart failure. This feature is available on some pacemakers. In contrast to standard pacing devices, the biventricular system has leads (wires) to the right ventricle with an additional lead to the left ventricle. By pacing the left ventricle from two sites, the heart’s contraction is coordinated or “resynchronized,” which can enhance the pumping efficiency of the heart.


Extraction (removal) of device and/or lead(s) as well as device replacement and/or lead replacement or revision surgery are performed. Extraction surgery is coordinated with cardiothoracic surgery and anesthesia services.


An implantable loop recorder (ILR) is a device inserted under the skin (mid-lateral chest) to record arrhythmias. An injectable ILR can be inserted at bedside without sedation.

 

Injectable vs. Regular Implantable ILR:

  • More memory
  • Wireless monitoring
  • Has remote activator (stores 6.5 minutes of data before remote activation)
  • Battery lasts three years vs. 18-24 months
  • Patient can have an MRI

 

Electrophysiology testing can identify specific areas in the heart that may be responsible for abnormally rapid or slow heart rates, for the purpose of radiofrequency catheter ablation or device implantation.

 

Radiofrequency catheter ablation or cryoablation may be done to destroy the AV node or specific areas of heart tissue identified to be responsible for an irregular heart rhythm. If the AV node is destroyed to prevent fast heart rates, a pacemaker is needed to send regular impulses to the lower heart chambers (ventricles). If tissue other than the AV node is responsible for rapid heart rates, a pacemaker may not be required.


Cardiac ablation cases can treat heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias), including atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardia, Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome and ventricular tachycardia.


Left atrial appendage closure cases involve the use of a permanent implant designed to close the left atrial appendage in the heart in an effort to reduce the risk of stroke.
Cardioversion uses electrical signal to “shock” an arrhythmia. It can be done externally or internally if the patient has an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).